Bowel Cancer

What is bowel cancer?

Colorectal cancer is the second most common non-cutaneous malignancy in Australia, 15, 367 cases in 2023 (8133 men and 7234 women) and second only to lung cancer in terms of cancer mortality. In 2021 there were 5,350 deaths attributed to colorectal cancer. In 2023, it is estimated that a person has a 1 in 69 (or 1.4%) risk of dying from colorectal cancer by the age of 85 (1 in 61 or 1.6% for males and 1 in 79 or 1.3% for females).(Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare). Bowel cancer develops from malignant cells that grow in the wall of the colon (large bowel).

Bowel Cancer Sydney Surgeon

The cancer may change your bowel habits. You may experience diarrhoea or constipation. You may also see blood in your bowel movements or notice that your stools are dark. It can eventually cause your bowel to become completely blocked.

How can bowel cancer be treated?

There are several different options for treating bowel cancer:

  • Surgery to remove the cancer along with part of your bowel either side of it
  • Chemotherapy to shrink the cancer and kill off cancer cells left after the operation
There are treatments to ease any blockage without treating the underlying cancer:
  • Forming a stoma (your bowel opening onto your skin)
  • Inserting a stent (metal mesh tube) across the cancer to hold your bowel open

Dr Golani has been trained in several australian and international colorectal surgery units and is a member of Colorectal Surgical Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSSANZ). He specialises in Laparoscopic (keyhole) Bowel Cancer surgery. This is a minimally invasive approach which has an advantage over open surgery as it only requires three or four small incisions in the abdomen versus the large single incision of open surgery. Most patients will experience less pain, a quicker recovery and a shorter hospital stay with laparoscopic surgery.

Combination of Treatments

Surgically removing the cancer offers the best chance of being free of bowel cancer. Combining surgery with chemotherapy may further increase the chance of being free of cancer.

Dr Golani discusses every cancer case with a multi-disciplinary team of specialist doctors to offer the best prognosis to his patients.

 

Rectal Cancer Surgery

In rectal cancer, a malignant growth occurs in the wall of the rectum. The rectum is the final part of the large bowel that is immediately after the anus. About 4,000 people develop rectal cancer every year in Australia.

A cancer in the rectum can bleed slowly. Blood may be present after a bowel motion. This can also result in anaemia is the body cannot replace the red blood cells lost by this rectal bleeding. Symptoms can include a feeling of discomfort when you pass a bowel motion and a feeling that you cannot empty your bowel fully. Rectal cancer can also cause changes in your bowel habits. You may get diarrhoea or constipation. The cancer may eventually cause your bowel to become completely blocked. Additionally if the cancer has spread outside your rectum, you may lose weight.

Treatment for Rectal Cancer

There are several different options for treating rectal cancer.

  • Surgery is an effective method to remove the cancer, along with part of your bowel either side of it. Early detection is a key so please consult your doctor with symptoms.
  • Radiotherapy may be used before/after the operation.
  • Chemotherapy may be used to shrink the cancer before the operation and kill off cancer cells left after the operation. If the cancer is too large to operate on straightaway, chemotherapy is often given along with radiotherapy for 6 weeks to try to shrink the cancer and improve the chance of the operation being a success. A blockage can be treated, without treating the underlying cancer, by forming a stoma (your bowel opening onto your skin).

Your Consultation

Dr. Golani will provide further discussion regarding the specifics of your diagnosis during your consultation. Additionally, you'll have the opportunity to select the hospital for your procedure and potentially set the date for your procedure.

The best surgical hospitals in Sydney are available for your surgery:

To schedule a consultation with Dr. Golani, please contact our team for a consultation with Dr Golani. We have appointments available at three convenient locations across Sydney:

Please note that a GP referral will be required prior to your consultation.

Contact Us

To make an initial consultation booking, please contact our office on 02 8599 9819.

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Hornsby Clinic Address:

Madison Building
Suite 7, 25-29 Hunter St,
Hornsby NSW 2077
Phone: (02) 8599 9819
Email: info@drgolani.com.au
Fax:(02) 9012 0976

HealthLink: drgolani



Our Horsnby clinic is located conviniently next to Hornsby Westfield & Hornsby Station
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Mater Clinic Address:

Suite 13, Level 1 Mater Clinic
Mater Hospital
25 Rocklands Rd, North Sydney NSW 2060
Phone: (02) 8599 9819
Email: info@drgolani.com.au
Fax:(02) 9012 0976

HealthLink: drgolani


Mater Clinic
Our Mater clinic is located within Mater Hospital. Parking and Entry (convenient Pickup and Drop Zone) is via 5 Gillies St, Wollstonecraft.
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Norwest Clinic Address:

Suite 301C, Level 3
Q Central Building
10 Norbrik Dr, Bella Vista NSW 2153
Phone: (02) 8599 9819
Email: info@drgolani.com.au
Fax:(02) 9012 0976

HealthLink: drgolani


Norwest Clinic - Q Central Building
Our Norwest - Bella Vista clinic is located within Q Central Building - opposite Norwest Private Hospital. Free Limited Parking is available within the Q Central Building. There is a drop off zone outside of the building. Paid parking is available opposite at Norwest Private Hospital. Additionally there is parking at Woolworths Norwest Circa (5 minutes walk from the Clinic)
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What do I bring to my appointment?

  • Referral letter
  • X-Rays/Scans
  • Test results relating to referral
  • Health fund card
  • Medicare card

Royal College of Surgeons     Colorectal Surgical Society of Australia and New Zealand     Royal College of Edinbirgh     Gastroenterological Society of Australia     Sydney Adventist Hospital (SAN)     The Mater Hospital     Norwest Private Hospital    










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